Blues

9

Farmer Man - Jah Palm - Farmer Man (Vinyl)

20.12.2021

Franklin walks them along the gradually unfolding modal groove while Carvin fills and rolls around them all. Harper's tenor break channels Coltrane, Shorter, and Sonny Rollins.

Franklin's furious bassline, Harper's roiling sax, and Carvin's skittering, break-laden kit work push Carn toward modal exploration with expansive chord voicings punctuated by speedy single-note runs. Carn never sacrifices the swinging, songlike structure while underscording the complexity in Tyner's harmonic inquiry. The "Acknowledgement" section of Coltrane's "A Love Supreme" is rendered with elegance and spiritual soul in Jean's delivery.

The familiar bass and piano theme buoys her. The horns gather force and cascade under and around her as Carn lays down fat, open-ended chords for the rhythm section to play off.

His lyrics are full of optimism and spirituality. Horace Silver's "Peace" closes. Carn's chart showcases an elegant interplay between bass and Rhodes piano as Jean expresses the lyric with nuanced resolve and resonance while the trombone emerges as a second voice.

All Farmer Man - Jah Palm - Farmer Man (Vinyl) Carn's Black Jazz titles are influential, but Infant Eyes arrived at a special Farmer Man - Jah Palm - Farmer Man (Vinyl) juncture. It balanced accessibility with adventure and established both the label and the Carns as co-creators of a brand new, specifically Afro-centric approach to creative jazz.

He found a home at the Farmer Man - Jah Palm - Farmer Man (Vinyl) Jazz label, where African-Americans called the shots and, of course, racial tension was nonexistent. Who was this year-old whose first album, Infant Eyes, sold very well away from the machinations of the music industry?

Following his muse to Los Angeles, he worked in an organ trio and studied with organ and piano player Larry Young, who had co-founded the seminal jazz-rock band Tony Williams' Lifetime and recorded an excellent mids hard-bop record titled Unity, among other things.

Carn assumes several roles well: organ and piano player, arranger and lyricist. His wife at the time, Jean, is just as impressive singing. First track 'Welcome' -- a Coltrane piece found on the early s collection The Gentle Sound of John Coltrane -- has Jean's operatic voice and a swirl of instruments conjuring a state of awe in just over a minute.

Next, Jean displays a world of conviction singing the joyous lyrics about a newborn that Doug penned for vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson's 'Little B's Poem' originally an instrumental on Hutcherson's Components album. Jean opens still another vista of wonder singing the new lyrics of the melodic Wayne Shorter ballad 'Infant Eyes. It was the first of twenty albums by a label that was very different from other new indie jazz labels that were being founded across the America.

This included albums that featured political and spiritually influenced music. Between and the label released twenty albums that included everything from spiritual jazz and soul-jazz to free jazz and funk.

Eclectic described the music that the label released. That described the albums that Black Jazz Records released during That was still to come. Doug Carn who was just twenty-three when he signed to Black Jazz Records.

Not long after this, he began work on his debut album Infant Eyes. Doug Carn put together a band and spent the best part of a year practising and then when he signed to Black Jazz Records recorded the album.

The rhythm section featured drummer Michael Carvin, bassist Henry Franklin and bandleader Doug Carn who switched between electric piano, organ and piano. Meanwhile his wife Jean added her unmistakable vocals. George Harper played tenor saxophone and flute and was joined in he front line by trombonist Al Hall Jr and Bob Frazier who played trumpet and flugelhorn. This talented and versatile band worked their way through the seven tracks which became Infant Eyes.

The session was engineered and produced by label owner Gene Russell and the album was scheduled for later in When Infant Eyes was released inDoug Carn still regarded the album as a demo.

Despite that, it was well received by critics and hailed as a groundbreaking album. It was a similar case with the other two albums Doug Carn released for the label. That was no surprise given the quality of the three albums he released. The first was Infant Eyes. Initially the arrangement is intense and almost frenetic before the band lock into a groove. By then, the scat disappears as unleashes an impassioned vocal.

On Moon Child Doug Carn switches to piano, and his playing is moody and melancholy. Meanwhile, the horns add an atmospheric backdrop during this eight minute epic which is an emotional roller coaster. Horns are to the fore as the organ sweeps and swirls and join with the cymbals in playing a crucial role in the sound and success of the track. However, six years later Doug Carn added lyrics and his wife Jean takes charge of the vocal.

Doug Carn added new lyrics full of social comment which are delivered by Jean. She plays a leading role in the success of breathtaking, powerful and poignant take on a familiar track from the late, great jazz pianist.

Despite that, it was the most successful album that Black Jazz Records released that year. Infant Eyes was very different to old school jazz and was new type of jazz album. It featured everything from avant-garde and even elements of free jazz, funk, fusion, soul, soul-jazz and spiritual jazz. These genres were combined by Doug Carn and Jean Carn who unleashed her five octave vocal on Infant Eyes which introduced the pair to the record buying public across America.

This was just the first chapter in the Doug and Jean Carn story. Infant Eyes was the first of four critically acclaimed albums that Doug Carn released between and These albums are now regarded as cult classics, and amongst the best that Black Jazz Records released during the five years it was in business.

And nothing elsewhere in the infinite universe like them either. Peter will ask, you know: "Have you dug 'Faces in the Jazzmatazz'? And which person are you in "Flibbity-Jib'? But the thing he is probably best loved for is a series of albums released in the late Fifties on Dot Records called Word Jazz. The four albums, recorded between andhave been anthologized several times over the course of their history including a vinyl collection on Blue Thumb and a CD on Rhinobut they have never before been made available on CD in their entirety.

In all, 27 tracks make their CD debut. Needless to say, Ken has also written some notes, and has provided some rare photos for the set. The Charlie Parker Dial MastersThe Judy Garland Decca MastersThe Machito Columbia Masters —the titles assume a certain form: the imperious definite article, the name of the artist, the recording company, and, at the end, that masterful word, masters.

But he did not define his era, and it did not define him. He is a performing artist of indeterminate medium, all but unknown to the general public and not well-known among musicians either. Most of his career has been in television and radio, where he lent his dark, agile bassvoice to numberless commercials. His album Colors was originally a series of radio spots for the Fuller Paint Company.

The accompaniment is not always jazz, nor is it exactly accompaniment. The absence of any clear boundary between music and sound, or sound and voice, might spark the thought that word jazz has more to do with Cagean compositionin sound than any bongos-and-angst record. But Nordine raises this possibility with the lightest touch, for he can be very funny, and this is maybe why his albums have aged so well.

The twenty-page insert booklet includes appreciationsby Laurie Anderson and Tom Waits, reminiscences by Nordine and Cunningham, all the original cover art and liner notes, and a new poem by Nordine. The only shortcoming of this album is its stingy run of five thousand copies, which are intermittently hard to find.

So if you see a copy, snap it up while you can. Bass — Emmet Frazier tracks:toHarold Gaylor tracks: toJimmy Bond tracks: toJohn Frigo tracks: to, Drums — Bob Frazier tracks:toJerome Slosberg tracks: to,Red Holt tracks: to Engineer — Jim Cunningham tracks: toto, Mason Coppinger tracks: toto Woodwind — Ken Soderbloom tracks:toPaul Horn tracks: to Tracks taken from Next! Track 20 recorded circa No re-channeled stereo was employed in this recording.

The Fairchild stereophonic disc mastering was use in transferring the original masters from tape to disc. Posted by Jillem on Friday, October 01, Sometimes I'm in the mood for hip music and nothing else will do. He is now highly recognized as one of the foremost exponents of a sophisticated style of largely instrumental music that combines elements of lounge music and jazz with Latin flavors. They're of such a similar qualitative standard that none can be singled out as definitive, or even recommended above the others.

The 20 tracks are drawn from RCA releases spanning toincluding both original compositions and oddball versions of standards like "Harlem Nocturne," "Night and Day," "Malaguena," and "Take the 'A' Train. Kansas City. Posted by Jillem on Thursday, September 30, Essential for all Prince Buster fans. One of the best from Farmer Man - Jah Palm - Farmer Man (Vinyl) man himself, worth every penny, now that it has been deleted.

Get it if you can. Very rare and amazing selection from the Prince's rarest sides; great sound, great artwork, pure ska and rocksteady masterpieces. Including the best whistling tune ever: "rock and shake", and "Dance Cleopatra", a total scorcher which was a minor hit in Holland in The Prince's recording plethoric recording output still begs for a proper reissue job.

Until then, true enthusiasts will carry on an almost archeological quest for scratchy elusive Blue Beat singles. Most of these tunes are worth five or ten times the price of this CD on 45, and not without Farmer Man - Jah Palm - Farmer Man (Vinyl). Get this while you can - its availability in Europe has been patchy to say the least. Possibly because he was part of a postwar, post-colonial social revolution, Prince Buster seems like some sort of ghetto supe- pioneer: a boxer, soundsystem operator, DJ, producer, live performer, humouristsocial and political commentator, owner of a record shop-label-and-jukebox empire, sharp dresser and all round coolest guy in Kingston, and therefore Jamaica, and therefore quite possibly the world at the time.

All his activities complemented and were complemented by the main event, which was his completely unique and inimitable voice, delivery and lyrics. He pronounced himself Prince, the Voice of the People, and made sure he lived up to his claims by being the best. Just as he apparently made sure he would win every boxing match, he made damn sure he only used the cream of Jamaican musicians, on the hottest and hardest rhythms for his backing tracks and productions.

When the time eventually came that he could no longer achieve that, I admire the fact that he largely quit the studio: nothing less than the best was ever going to be good enough for Prince Buster, and that ensured that his incredible output remains undiluted and in tact to this day.

He continued with the occasional live appearance, some of which I saw and which were always of the highest possible standard. I was lucky enough to travel with him to one gig and he really exuded the true meaning of cool a word which has become greatly abused now.

It was funny to watch. That ghetto humour was at the heart of a lot of his lyrics and a huge part of his popularity in Jamaica. It could be brutal, as could the ghetto morality that went hand in hand with it in his lyrics. On the stage when THAT voice was given free rein, it remained completely unspoiled — like his legacy — and came out exactly the same as ever.

He had always mixed singing and speaking so seamlessly and tunefully that at times it is almost impossible to say which of those two things he is doing.

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