Rock and Roll

9

Flying Child - David Buskin - David Buskin (Vinyl, LP, Album)

13.09.2021

He has expressed disappointment at her handling of Lennon's estate, and at the difference between his upbringing and Sean's, adding, "when Dad gave up music for a couple of years to be with Sean, why couldn't he do that with me? He has said that he is his "mother's boy", which Ono has cited as the reason why she was never able to get close to him: "Julian and I tried to be friends.

Of course, if he's too friendly with me, then I think that it hurts his other relatives. He was very loyal to his mother. That was the first thing that was in his mind. This image, addressing the role of religious and art historical iconography in the subordination of women, became "one of the most iconic images of the feminist art movement.

The post-punk rock band Death of Samanthafounded innamed themselves after a song from Ono's album Approximately Infinite Universealso called " Death of Samantha ". Canadian rock band Barenaked Ladies ' debut single was " Be My Yoko Ono ", first released in and later appearing on their album Gordon. It also has a "sarcastic imitation of Yoko Ono's unique vocal style in the bridge". In response Ono posted an open letter to the band on her website, thanking them and reflecting on her and Lennon's relationship with the city.

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The Harvard Independent. Archived from the original on January 2, Ken; Robertson, Kirsty Wilfrid Laurier University Press. By most accounts, Lennon shared a common working-class attitude toward homosexuality, and expressed himself volubly about fags and queers — affectionately, but often with a bite, when it came to his manager.

As Lennon grew older, he embraced feminism and grew out of his lumpen early attitudes, as of course someone with his intelligence and personality would. Still, he and Epstein were close. Lennon said the involvement was never consummated, but you could see how when he told his bandmates the story it could have been elaborated on to give Lennon a taste of his own medicine. Sometime after, at a large public party, Lennon beat the living shit out of a friend who made a crack about him and Epstein, nearly causing a scandal.

His business instincts and flair for organization took the Beatles to the top, but it would have taken a far greater mind than his to ride competently on the financial whirlwind he helped create. He died of what was apparently an accidental overdose shortly after Sgt.

A very nice and original statement of ambiguity and self-doubt from George. This, the title song, might have been a good introduction to it. We then got myriad varying styles and varying quality with no sign of the metaband again until the reprise. That said, within the confines of the record, the song certainly rocks, albeit harmlessly. The release of the album was a worldwide event. Happy, happy, happy. A great hook for the only good song on Beatles for Sale.

This chorus has a tense groove and a lovely melody; all sorts of fans love this song. The verses are just pointless variations on a theme that goes nowhere. Again, the effortless rise in the melody was tracked unerringly by his supple voice. Of the myriad call-and-response numbers McCartney threw together, this is one of the most lethal. The melodic climb in the chorus nails it; note how he affects to have a bit of trouble hitting the high notes, when of course he could sing them easily.

Great ending, too. This Lennon throwaway speaks multitudes. He was probably on heroin during the recording of this track, if not the composition, hence the convincing delivery of the title words. The film featured the members of the Beatles on what was supposed to be a surreal version of the British tradition of the touristy bus trip, and was shown in a high-profile forum: The traditional BBC day-after-Christmas special Boxing Day, there.

It created a minor scandal, not because it was outrageous but because it sucked balls. Magical Mystery Tour is unfunny, uninteresting, uncreative, cheap-looking, extraordinarily poorly shot, and — ironically — never went anywhere. But the title song is a marvel.

But this is classic-era Beatles at their classic-era standard, which is to say the song sports a dizzying array of production innovations, melodic frills, thrilling instrumentation, head-snapping song construction, precise singing, and a driving backing track. And one of those lovely Beatles codas. Still, docked ten notches for false advertising.

A hard-rock Indian song. Harrison found a thunderous riff in the music and uses it well. It trails off from time to time, though. What a great song, from the ringing acoustic strum to another one of those rising McCartney melodies in the chorus. It was a shtick, a trick, we knew it. Upped 20 notches for subtext. A classic Rubber Soul track. A melancholy love song from McCartney for once. Another tossed-off track that outclasses virtually everything else around.

Notice how again McCartney effortlessly — that word again — makes the transition to European love man, dropping casually into French, and asserting his bass into a lead instrument.

The track mirrored developments in his life. During this time, he was dating a Flying Child - David Buskin - David Buskin (Vinyl named Jane Asher who came from a privileged family. In continental fashion, the family invited McCartney to live with them.

But he had three creditable songs on this album. They and producer Martin expressed regret in later years for not being more available. Songwriting was slow for Harrison. He himself noted that the pair had the relative luxury of getting all their bad songs out of their systems early. He had to start from scratch, without a partner, and in public. And one other thing: Harrison himself contributed any number of powerful and distinctive riffs to Lennon-McCartney songs, over and above his distinctive playing.

Another important Lennon-McCartney collaboration. The pair stitched together three verses of psychedelic patchwork as a joint project, with a six-word chorus. Lennon himself works this one on out, and the other members of the group deliver the unrelenting pile-driver of a backing track. Chirpy Paul at his chirpiest.

It was originally a showcase for drummer Pete Best in the Beatles, but Starr had also been singing it with the Hurricanes. They were in fact supposed to play live, but in the end the group created a typically ornate backing track in the studio to sing in front of.

Today such exposure is now available to every kitten with a smart phone that can play piano, but at the time the broadcast — a bravura show of technological force by the BBC — was a not insignificant event. You can find it online, and see Keith Moon and Mick Jagger in the audience.

Maybe you can watch it and think about where these guys had been five years earlier and not get a little choked up. The song later turned up on the Yellow Submarine soundtrack album. This scorching track was, amazingly, just another single. McCartney, of course, wins in the pop realm. All but his very earliest songs and his later throwaways are sophisticated, and everything reverberates with taste and perspective.

In other words, the melody itself tells a story. Lennon, McCartney, and Harrison then lock into the harmonies that helped make their name. The line about pain leading to pleasure takes this to the next level, as does his sharp intakes of breath. And LP were the Beatles to point fingers at a guy sleeping with his groupies? His keyboard work here is as powerful a hard-rock piano line as I can think of. And I know he meant the song to be sympathetic to women.

Confidential to P. McC: Men have something to do with babies, too. Another bit of romantic-advice-giving, with a not-so-veiled threat. Lennon would do it, too. Another concussive beginning, another arresting chorus; but the band to this point had never felt so unwound, so bashy. McCartney specialized in melodic lines that reached ever upward. Here he started high and went down, the perfect melody for doing the frug.

The song accompanies the famous freedom scene in A Hard Days Nightcreating one of the most enduring images of the band. A beautiful McCartney song that much more could have been made of. It feels like it was put on the album without much attention paid to it. The hokey hootenanny guitar line at the end of each verse, for example, was a bad idea.

One of the first signs of the ferocity Lennon was capable of. A slight song that finds enormous force in Indian song stylings and a powerful production schema.

Two quibbles: Leaving aside the line that includes the title words, the lyrics are quite lame. And whether it belongs on Sgt. The bridge has a character, and the ending fanfare works as well.

This song is lyrically one of the most unusual Lennon compositions, a tone poem of soft images. The connection to his mother is dreamy and tangential, but there is no doubt that this tribute to her is one of his best songs. Hard to remember today that, with a concern for the consumer that has never been evinced Stateside, British record companies thought it was cheesy to put singles on albums — forcing consumers in effect to pay for the same song twice.

In America, it would be no. In other words, the Beatles occupied the no. Recorded in the studio live, with just an overdubbed piano. On this one, based on sheer velocity, good humor, and talent, he gets a pass. George and Ringo sided with John, and the rift was never healed. The record shows that McCartney was almost certainly right. The debacle almost certainly cost the band hundreds of millions of dollars over the ensuing decades.

Here, Lennon, playing a bit with Dylanesque vocal stylings, produces another passionate pop song about self-doubt.

Lennon becomes disclosive, where McCartney is emotionally insular, and ragged, where McCartney tends to wrap everything up with a bow. The development began to create enormous artistic tension in the band, which would lead to its greatest works. Notice how the song, innovatively, ends with a flute solo. Another intensely pleasurable emotional rock ballad from Paul McCartney. One of the difficulties McCartney had was that, when he tried not to write straight whimsy certainly a laudable endeavor he got himself all tied up in poettification.

And yet, as sung by McCartney here or with him aiming his moon-cow eyes into the camera in the Let It Be filmany cynicism you might have gets washed away with that wild and windy night.

This is everything a rock recording should be. A killer hook, memorable even by Beatles standards; an innovative unique world of sounds, set off unto itself; even nonsense lyrics that paradoxically make sense. The band squeezed in one last song, and John Lennon stepped up to scream his lungs out and lock down a whirlwind on the first take.

In fact, McCartney says he contributed a lot to it. It turned out that nothing could withstand the force of the Beatles, not even the Beatles themselves. As irresistible a song as the s saw. The title came from Ringo, who delighted the band with his nonce catchphrases. The two rhythms guitars are whatever the aural equivalent of mesmerizing is. The opening chord, incidentally, was the handiwork of George Harrison.

Lennon and McCartney also manage to pull off making what could be a whiny song sound joyous and game. Upped ten notches for being written on demand, overnight, when the producers of the film decided they needed a raucous title song. It was recorded a few days later. At this point, innovation bled into every song the band recorded. The opening a cappella section; the new Beatles guitar riff, twisted and curled and unchanging; the bass booming like an Underground train rumbling below.

The song pauses now and again, only to rev up again, all on the same unchanging chord. As for the lyrics, McCartney was approaching his golden era. Paul McCartney has scores of them: Pops songs that are smart, ridiculously catchy, and varied in their instrumentation, tone, arrangements, melodies, and vocal performance. But Lennon helped him get the lyrics right. Mid-range Lennon, again in confessional mode. But Lennon never really had a mother or a father. Side two:. After the manic and timeless success that was their first movie, the band and director Richard Lester went back to the well for Help!

Despite the conceptual problems, there are striking moments in the first half, not least the cutaway to the credits, and of course the conceit of the foursome going home to a row of townhomes, all of which were connected inside. The Help! A sunny McCartney Album). A Lennon song about a celebrity doctor who dispensed drugs to rich clients in Manhattan. There are various stories about whom or what this song is really about, but in the end the critical undertones seem sophomoric; after all, the Beatles had been surviving on amphetamines for nearly a decade.

Signs of growth, but boy this is an uninteresting song. The intro is one of their drabbest. Another of the so-so unadorned Lennon songs from the last days of the Beatles. Too many of his songs consist of the title words repeated over and over in the chorus. The band played it on the famous rooftop concert in Let It Bebut it was left off the album. The song, famously written as he waited for some friends on Blue Jay Way in the L. Some nice sounds though.

This exercise in sound collage could be seen as slumming. Those who shelled out money for them at the time could take comfort only in the fact that they must have been more tedious to make than they were to consume. A good, rough, and quite novel guitar sound kicks off this track, which the band thought was good enough to lead off Revolverone of the most significant rock albums ever made.

Indeed, Harrison has three songs on the album. Sound and music and meaning came together for the band here in a way that it never would again. They were adults with an ever-changing, LP way of looking at the world; at the same time, the extraordinary tastefulness of the production techniques instilled by George Martin gave them powerful tools to capture those impressions. McCartney and Lennon worked on this song, off and on, for months. Too many of the songs on Let It Be are just … minor.

This has a hummable melody, a decent bridge, a rambling bass track by McCartney, and really not much else. Some people love this song. I guess this is a minor Beatles song, from the period just before things started to get really interesting, but the melody and the arrangement mix, here, as in so many other songs in their oeuvre, in a lovely and highly likable way.

Note the waltz time in the middle eight, with the melancholy insert from Lennon. A crisp and clean take on the Chuck Berry classic. The band barrels through the verses at top speed, not noticing they are supposed to done herky-jerky style. As recorded, three minutes of pop glory set to a melancholy, aching melody, wrapped up in whistles, flutes, vocals, production swirls, and McCartney ululations.

We take it all for granted now, but the sound spaces created on the track are exquisite. The result is lulling and stately, a dream in audio Technicolor. Too much of the lyrics are clumsy. Is Paul himself the Fool on the Hill? A raucous song that tries to come up with a little social comment. Pepper to compare with the three or four landmark tracks he delivered on Revolver.

This song took its inspiration from a Corn Flakes commercial. There are a lot of groovy sound effects, but the story it tries to purvey is a little confused, and it clashes conceptually with the far more visionary treatment of the same subject in the last track on the album. McCartney can write a great rock song out of anything. Here we have JoJo andSweet Loretta, with other whimsical words strung together as if they mean something, which they most assuredly do not.

The Lennon-McCartney songwriting sessions were supposed to take care of vapid lyric conceptions like this. McCartney is barely even processing what he is saying. Infectious, unexpected, uplifting, highly tuneful. I sing along every time it comes out of a speaker within earshot, just as you do. A charming Harrison song from Help!

The real star here is the sound. The vocals, with a ghostly aura around them, fill most of the recording; way in the back, a bass and a subtle drum track seem to exist on an entirely different plane.

The trouble with too many of his compositions is that they turn in on themselves; they have no meaning outside of the actual song, and neither do the funny guitar noises he comes up with here. The result? It never appeared on a normal band album in the U. LP release that vacuumed up a number of uncollected hits. Still in the U. I admire Harrison for singing about things he believed in. The chorus rocks okay. A somewhat forgotten novelty instrumental from Magical Mystery Tour.

Another bit of relationship knowingness. McCartney sings the heck out of it; the manic instrumental breaks lack rock-and-roll bite, but for a pop song they are pretty lively. Things are getting better. Better, better, better. The singer used to beat his wife, but things are getting better. It was top-ten hit in the U. The goodwill the band engendered and the happiness it delivered sweeps over our perception of even the inferior work in late-period Beatles.

This is a very pretty John Lennon song whose lyrics go on and on across the universe. He was proud of it; to me, the whole thing, including the faux -Indian chorus, sounds dated. The song, which the band had recorded but not released, appeared on a charity album inand then, in different form, on Let It Be the next year, Spectored up.

The original version is on Past Masters. The earlier version, while marred by some bird sounds and some chirpy munchkin backing vocal, is a little more organic-sounding. The song is not well served by the clunky break. A great find by the band. Some people like this song for the guitar attack, and the full-throated vocal attack as well. The song was recorded LP the early part ofbefore the group trouped off to India, and turned up later as part of the detritus on the first side of the Yellow Submarine soundtrack album.

It can be asked about a lot of pop songs, in the s and of course before and after: Why do boys who suddenly find themselves stars, and sleep with a different, willing woman after every show, suddenly start writing songs about unfaithful women? I mean, besides projection. Docked 20 notches for making you sing along with a guy who wants to kill his girlfriend.

He had so many advantages, and lived an amazing life. So he was of course entitled to — and deserving of — expiation artistically. It feels like he wants to have it both ways. All the guitar workouts seem forced. Lennon would tame and focus these feelings to much better effect a few years later on Plastic Ono Band. His voice was so limited McCartney fashioned a melody for him largely centered around five contiguous notes.

The ending presented a challenge. By the time Revolver was releasedthe band members were adults, and dealing with unprecedented pressures — recording, money, the constant push and pull of fame, and pressing management questions.

Epstein, by all accounts a talented guy, was only half a visionary, and was damaged by drug addiction and the debilitating life he had to lead, hiding his sexuality from the world.

The band knew Epstein was gay, but largely left it alone, except for Lennon and his sharp tongue. By most accounts, Lennon shared a common working-class attitude toward homosexuality, and expressed himself volubly about fags and queers — affectionately, but often with a bite, when it came to his manager. As Lennon grew older, he embraced feminism and grew out of his lumpen early attitudes, as of course someone with his intelligence and personality would.

Still, he and Epstein were close. Lennon said the involvement was never consummated, but you could see how when he told his bandmates the story it could have been elaborated on to give Lennon a taste of his own medicine.

Sometime after, at a large public party, Lennon beat the living shit out of a friend who made a crack about him and Epstein, nearly causing a scandal. His business instincts and flair for organization took the Beatles to the top, but it would have taken a far greater mind than his to ride competently on the financial whirlwind he helped create. He died of what was apparently an accidental overdose shortly after Sgt.

A very nice and original statement of ambiguity and self-doubt from George. This, the title song, might have been a good introduction to it. We then got myriad varying styles and varying quality with no sign of the metaband again until the reprise. That said, within the confines of the record, the song certainly rocks, albeit harmlessly. The release of the album was a worldwide event. Happy, happy, happy.

A great hook for the only good song on Beatles for Sale. This chorus has a tense groove and a lovely melody; all sorts of fans love this song. The verses are just pointless variations on a theme that goes nowhere. Again, the effortless rise in the melody was tracked unerringly by his supple voice.

Of the myriad call-and-response numbers McCartney threw together, this is one of the most lethal. The melodic climb in the chorus nails it; note how he affects to have a bit of trouble hitting the high notes, when of course he could sing them easily. Great ending, too. This Lennon throwaway speaks multitudes. He was probably on heroin during the recording of this track, if not the composition, hence the convincing delivery of the title words. The film featured the members of the Beatles on what was supposed to be a surreal version of the British tradition of the touristy bus trip, and was shown in a high-profile forum: The traditional BBC day-after-Christmas special Boxing Day, there.

It created a minor scandal, not because it was outrageous but because it sucked balls. Magical Mystery Tour is unfunny, uninteresting, uncreative, cheap-looking, extraordinarily poorly shot, and — ironically — never went anywhere. But the title song is a marvel. But this is classic-era Beatles at their classic-era standard, which is to say the song sports a dizzying array of production innovations, melodic frills, thrilling instrumentation, head-snapping song construction, precise singing, and a driving backing track.

And one of those lovely Beatles codas. Still, docked ten notches for false advertising. A hard-rock Indian song. Harrison found a thunderous riff in the music and uses it well. It trails off from time to time, though. What a great song, from the ringing acoustic strum to another one of those rising McCartney melodies in the chorus. It was a shtick, a trick, we knew it.

Upped 20 notches for subtext. A classic Rubber Soul track. A melancholy love song from McCartney for once.

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